While ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light possesses germicidal effects that helps combat the spread of deadly pathogens, some common misconceptions hinder universal access to UV-C disinfection devices. Instead of passing on UV-C disinfection, inform yourself on the actual facts and consider if incorporating devices like UV-CLEAN into your environment could complement existing cleaning protocols.

Misconception:
UV-C rays are dangerous

Get the Facts:
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that people are not exposed to UV-C radiation (to an intensity of 100 microwatts per square centimeter at wavelength 254 nanometers) for more than one minute at a time. NIOSH also recommends that people are not exposed to 30 uW/cm2 for more than 200 seconds during an eight-hour period1.

Why UV-CLEAN?
Yes, people should not come into contact with UV-C light for extended periods of time; however, reputable UV-C disinfection devices like UV-CLEAN feature built-in motion sensors for safe operation. If motion is detected, UV-C light powers off and the cleaning cycle is discontinued. After the task is completed and if no motion is detected after a specified amount of time, a new additional cleaning cycle begins, ensuring optimal disinfection. In a recent published case study, exposure testing found that the aforementioned process for UV-CLEAN results in under seven percent of the maximum dosage recommendation set by the NIOSH for an eight-hour shift. You can read the full study here.

Misconception:
There is no way to tell if UV-C light is on/working

Get the Facts:
UV-C light, like all ultraviolet rays, are invisible to most humans.

Why UV-CLEAN?
Although UV-C light is invisible, it doesn’t mean you can’t tell it is working hard to disinfect. UV-C disinfection devices like UV-CLEAN often come with internal memories. In fact, UV-CLEAN has a built-in audit trail, enabling users to pull reports. Additionally, UV-CLEAN was proven to eliminate 99.99% of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) endospores from keyboards in recent NSF International testing.

As part of the test, different keyboard keys were inoculated with C. diff and MRSA before being exposed to UV-C light via the UV-CLEAN unit. Multiple exposure times were evaluated also. After post-swabbing and subsequent incubation, the following reductions were calculated and reported: There was a 91.1% reduction in C. diff after 10 minutes of UV-C exposure; there was a 99.996% reduction in C. diff after 30 minutes of UVC exposure; there was a 99.996% reduction in MRSA after 10 minutes of UV-C exposure; and there was a 99.998% reduction in MRSA after 15 minutes of UV-C exposure. Review the entire NSF International report here.

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Sources
1Kowalski W. Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation Handbook. 2009:297 (Table 12.2-293-299).